Showing posts tagged: sunday-problem


Sunday Problem #29

Since everybody hopefully has a bit more free time at this time of the year, I will briefly continue on the subject of difficult problems.

This problem is from no other than Igo Hatsuyō-Ron, probably the most difficult collection of classic tsumego. In the present day, players aspiring to become professional are the core audience of the book; historically, the …

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Sunday Problem #28

Sometimes it is good to spend time and effort trying to solve difficult problems. Even if you are unable to find the solution, this will improve your reading and, more importantly, help build character in a way that you will get less demotivated by difficult game positions.

This problem was first shown to me by ‘Bass’, a Finnish go player, …

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Sunday Problem #27

Finland is celebrating its 103rd Independence Day today, and so, for this week’s problem, I ended up composing a tsumego in Finland’s shape.

There’s a lot of open space, which complicates reading, but as far as I could see there is only one solution.

Black to play.

Solution
Failure
A straightforward defence such as black 1, planning to sacrifice just …

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Sunday Problem #26

With this post, we have reached half a year’s worth of Sunday problems! In case you haven’t noticed, this page (the link is under the ‘material’ tab and also on the right-side bar) lists all the Sunday problems in easily accessible form.

This problem is from the Japanese book (Tatsujin no tsumego), or Expert’s Tsumego. According to …

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Sunday Problem #25

To complete the set, this sample problem is from the advanced section of Maeda’s Tsumego Collection.

Black to play.

Solution
Solution
The eye-stealing placement of 1 looks like the natural starting point, but after White connects with 2, the next move is key. Only Black’s non-obvious sacrificing move of 3 will then manage to capture. After White resists with 4, black 5 connects under and the white group only has one eye.
If White instead responds to black 1 with 4, then black 3 again kills.

Sunday Problem #24

While last week’s Sunday problem was from the elementary section of Maeda’s Tsumego Collection, this week’s problem is from the intermediate section.

Black to play.

Solution
Solution
The key to this problem is the non-obvious black 5. If Black captured the two stones instead, white 5 would capture the black group whole; therefore, sacrificing the three stones to the right is the best Black can do. After black 7, Black lives with a minimal shape.

Sunday Problem #23

This week’s problem is from Maeda Nobuaki 9p’s three-part tsumego collection, titled simply (Maeda Tsumego-Shū), or Maeda’s Tsumego Collection. The three volumes together contain 585 relatively basic life-and-death problems that make for good reading practice for players of all levels.

A shortened version of the second volume can be bought on SmartGo Books under the title ‘Life …

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Sunday Problem #22

While on the topic of endgame problems, it would be remiss of me not to bring up Kanō Yoshinori 9p’s excellent (Yose-Jiten), or Endgame Dictionary.

When I was insei, this book single-handedly had the biggest influence on my endgame improvement. The book explains how to count values of moves (by swing counting), showcases many kinds of endgame …

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Sunday Problem #21

Since we got started on the topic of whole-board endgame problems with Sunday Problem #20, here is another one.

This problem is from another Japanese problem book with an untranslatable name: (Katsu-yose no zetsumyō na tejun) by Mitsunaga Junzō 6p. A rough English translation would be Exquisite game-winning move orders in the endgame – feel free …

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Sunday Problem #20

This is a whole-board endgame problem from Ōhashi Hirofumi 6p’s book, (Sōkai! Kachisuji-sagashi) or Refreshing! Searching for the winning play.

If the title sounds strange in English, it is because sōkai does not translate very well; ‘refreshing’ or ‘invigorating’ are technically correct translations, but Western go players would rarely use them for the feeling of relief …

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